A collection of backers' stories

Lunar Stories is a collection of written submissions from people who have backed Lunar Mission One on Kickstarter, explaining what they love about the project, and why they are supporting it.

Our community is at the heart of Lunar Mission One and we are incredibly proud to have inspired so many people already. We hope to continue to capture the imagination of people from around the world.

If you would like to share your own Lunar Story with us please contact us here

Abdulaziz Fahd Al Seja

I always had a love for space since I was a child. Star gazing was actually one of my hobbies. I also remember watching the entire cosmos series in one sitting (several times). Although I am so far away from it now and it seems impossible, I haven’t lost hope in the dream that I might one day be able to venture into space. The idea that I can actually contribute to a mission such as this one, and actually have a hand in making it become a reality is such an honour to me. Not to mention that I get participate in future projects and vote which is the perfect cherry on top of the situation!

Adrian Quiroz

Carl Sagan once said: "Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known." I believe that space is humanity's current frontier. Why is it that we haven't gone to the moon in 40 years? I'm so glad Lunar Missions Ltd is working to make this a reality. Keep up the good work! The world is watching and supporting you.

Alistair Smith

I wanted to support this mission, firstly because I've always been interested in space exploration, but also as something to give to my 7 grandchildren, that in years to come they can think about. I'm hoping to have all their names or images included in my memory box, so they can say there's a reference to them on the Moon!

Amelia Young

I'm very interested in quantum physics, string theory and if the 11th dimension is ‘super gravity’.
Lunar Mission One gives us an opportunity to be involved with, and take an interest in Space Exploration, and what 'out there' has to offer.
The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) smashes protons which no doubt one day will reveal to us The Higgs Boson (the building blocks to life.)
This LM1 will unlock as much if not more than we expect...but only if we keep looking.
I have every faith in our scientists.

Andrew

I want our race to be off this planet, and possibly also off Mars when the sun starts to swell and the place becomes uninhabitable.

Andrew Birkin

I first became interested in space when I was about 18 and started working on Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey. At my school I had been a hopeless case – I think I got the lowest mark ever recorded in science – and I knew very little about space. That changed when I got a phone call from an old colleague asking if I wanted to work as the tea boy on a “space movie” that was about to be made at MGM studios by Stanley Kubrick. I’d seen and loved Dr Strangelove while hitchhiking across America and was immediately interested.
Kubrick was incredibly secretive and very few people got to see the script. But one of the very first Xerox machines had been flown across from California. It kept catching fire, and as it was my job to pull the pages out before they burned, I got to read the whole thing and became fascinated by the ideas explored in the film.

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Andrew MacDonald

I've backed LM1 for a few reasons. I've always been interested in space and what we DON'T know about the universe, I am in awe of people like Brian Cox, and the amazing things he gets to be involved in. It's all so interesting and exciting. What a day job! But mostly I am looking forward to sending a strand of hair to the Moon, to be (almost) immortalised up there, but not my hair, oh no, it will be the hair of my 4 year old son, Dexter.

You never know, one day, a few million years from now (or about a week after LM1 completes its mission (ha ha!)) Mr ET might find Dexter's DNA…

Andy Dougharty

Some may recall the famous account of Babe Ruth pointing to the center-field fence in the 1932 World Series. With two strikes against him, he hammered the ball over the fence for a home run. From that moment on, it didn’t matter how. It didn’t matter why. It just mattered that it was so. It did not matter that he was ‘crowding the plate’ or that the wind was in his favor. It mattered that it was so, and that is what inspires us.
When John F. Kennedy made his famous speech announcing that we would send a man to the moon, there was no answer to the question of how. There was no proof it could be done. Much of what was eventually required to make it happen didn’t even exist as an idea at the time. It didn’t matter, though. What mattered was the determination, the absolute conviction that it would be so.
As an educator, a Principal of Global Jaya School in Indonesia, I am fascinated by the details of things, the how and the why. I am even more fascinated by the context that allows for those details to “be” in the first place. Lunar Mission One isn’t just about going to the Moon, retrieving a sample and then leaving behind a DNA sample of the program’s sponsors. I want the students of Global Jaya School to grab hold of the immense and unforeseen possibilities at which LM1 can only hint. Crowdfunding, entrepreneurship, truly international cooperation, creativity and necessity as drivers of innovation and invention, breakthrough and commitment. None of these things will look the same in ten years. I want my students to know what it is like to commit to something that will be so because they and others like them say: it will be so! I want them to be empowered by a sense of commitment to what will be and to the possibility of who they might be as a consequence. They have within them, as do we all, the same stuff that sent that ball over the fence and a man to the Moon.
Andy Dougharty, Global Jaya School, Indonesia

AndyW

As a young boy I was inspired by the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo missions. I have a 10 year old grandson with whom I'll share this experience. Considering the years from concept to landing, he and I will have the opportunity to follow its evolution and most important BE PART OF THE MISSION!

With deep feelings about our planet and the humans who live here, someday we will be gone. Whether it's colonists of the Moon hundreds of years from now or beings from other worlds thousands of years into the future, I'm delight to be part of leaving something behind so they have a glimpse of the mankind on Earth during our time.